paperbeatsscissors:

a precise calculation.
paperbeatsscissors:

a precise calculation.
paperbeatsscissors:

a precise calculation.
paperbeatsscissors:

a precise calculation.
paperbeatsscissors:

a precise calculation.
paperbeatsscissors:

a precise calculation.
paperbeatsscissors:

a precise calculation.
altcomix:

A story from Daddy’s Girl, by Debbie Dreschler.
Debbie Dreschler was an awesome comic artist who, seemingly, abruptly retired after only a few years of work in the 90’s.  She now has a website showing illustration work, and no mention of her comics work (that I saw in the 15 minutes I browsed it).  Her work was utterly raw, and written from the point of a young adult.  The first collection, Daddy’s Girl is about a dysfunctional nuclear family, where the father is sexually abusing the main character, Lily.  The focus of the book covers her home life and life at school, and the degree to which Lily internalises everything that happens to her.  She reacts in erratic ways to things, as everything in her life sends ripples to the way she interprets everything else.  It’s a heartbreaking book.  Lily just can’t understand her life, and feels so responsible for things that are completely out of her hands.  I’m sure this description is simplifying it too much; I have just reread it after many years, but that was my quick take away from it.  I am not a woman, and I was never abused in such a way, but the feelings are genuine and absolutely relatable.  Even as an adult, there is a quick reaction to internalise blame, but luckily adults (usually) have the sensibility to put things in perspective.  Reading Daddy’s Girl has you feel a kind of helplessness, as there is nothing you can do to help Lily understand.
I can’t help but feel that Dreschler would be a major artist today if she were still working.  When this book came out in the mid-90s, the readership of comics still skewed male, and the subject matter was enough to keep it from being really mainstream.  This is a mature, distressing book in places.  With the Internet as it is today though, this sort of work can have a much wider reach.  If only.
altcomix:

A story from Daddy’s Girl, by Debbie Dreschler.
Debbie Dreschler was an awesome comic artist who, seemingly, abruptly retired after only a few years of work in the 90’s.  She now has a website showing illustration work, and no mention of her comics work (that I saw in the 15 minutes I browsed it).  Her work was utterly raw, and written from the point of a young adult.  The first collection, Daddy’s Girl is about a dysfunctional nuclear family, where the father is sexually abusing the main character, Lily.  The focus of the book covers her home life and life at school, and the degree to which Lily internalises everything that happens to her.  She reacts in erratic ways to things, as everything in her life sends ripples to the way she interprets everything else.  It’s a heartbreaking book.  Lily just can’t understand her life, and feels so responsible for things that are completely out of her hands.  I’m sure this description is simplifying it too much; I have just reread it after many years, but that was my quick take away from it.  I am not a woman, and I was never abused in such a way, but the feelings are genuine and absolutely relatable.  Even as an adult, there is a quick reaction to internalise blame, but luckily adults (usually) have the sensibility to put things in perspective.  Reading Daddy’s Girl has you feel a kind of helplessness, as there is nothing you can do to help Lily understand.
I can’t help but feel that Dreschler would be a major artist today if she were still working.  When this book came out in the mid-90s, the readership of comics still skewed male, and the subject matter was enough to keep it from being really mainstream.  This is a mature, distressing book in places.  With the Internet as it is today though, this sort of work can have a much wider reach.  If only.
altcomix:

A story from Daddy’s Girl, by Debbie Dreschler.
Debbie Dreschler was an awesome comic artist who, seemingly, abruptly retired after only a few years of work in the 90’s.  She now has a website showing illustration work, and no mention of her comics work (that I saw in the 15 minutes I browsed it).  Her work was utterly raw, and written from the point of a young adult.  The first collection, Daddy’s Girl is about a dysfunctional nuclear family, where the father is sexually abusing the main character, Lily.  The focus of the book covers her home life and life at school, and the degree to which Lily internalises everything that happens to her.  She reacts in erratic ways to things, as everything in her life sends ripples to the way she interprets everything else.  It’s a heartbreaking book.  Lily just can’t understand her life, and feels so responsible for things that are completely out of her hands.  I’m sure this description is simplifying it too much; I have just reread it after many years, but that was my quick take away from it.  I am not a woman, and I was never abused in such a way, but the feelings are genuine and absolutely relatable.  Even as an adult, there is a quick reaction to internalise blame, but luckily adults (usually) have the sensibility to put things in perspective.  Reading Daddy’s Girl has you feel a kind of helplessness, as there is nothing you can do to help Lily understand.
I can’t help but feel that Dreschler would be a major artist today if she were still working.  When this book came out in the mid-90s, the readership of comics still skewed male, and the subject matter was enough to keep it from being really mainstream.  This is a mature, distressing book in places.  With the Internet as it is today though, this sort of work can have a much wider reach.  If only.
altcomix:

A story from Daddy’s Girl, by Debbie Dreschler.
Debbie Dreschler was an awesome comic artist who, seemingly, abruptly retired after only a few years of work in the 90’s.  She now has a website showing illustration work, and no mention of her comics work (that I saw in the 15 minutes I browsed it).  Her work was utterly raw, and written from the point of a young adult.  The first collection, Daddy’s Girl is about a dysfunctional nuclear family, where the father is sexually abusing the main character, Lily.  The focus of the book covers her home life and life at school, and the degree to which Lily internalises everything that happens to her.  She reacts in erratic ways to things, as everything in her life sends ripples to the way she interprets everything else.  It’s a heartbreaking book.  Lily just can’t understand her life, and feels so responsible for things that are completely out of her hands.  I’m sure this description is simplifying it too much; I have just reread it after many years, but that was my quick take away from it.  I am not a woman, and I was never abused in such a way, but the feelings are genuine and absolutely relatable.  Even as an adult, there is a quick reaction to internalise blame, but luckily adults (usually) have the sensibility to put things in perspective.  Reading Daddy’s Girl has you feel a kind of helplessness, as there is nothing you can do to help Lily understand.
I can’t help but feel that Dreschler would be a major artist today if she were still working.  When this book came out in the mid-90s, the readership of comics still skewed male, and the subject matter was enough to keep it from being really mainstream.  This is a mature, distressing book in places.  With the Internet as it is today though, this sort of work can have a much wider reach.  If only.
altcomix:

A story from Daddy’s Girl, by Debbie Dreschler.
Debbie Dreschler was an awesome comic artist who, seemingly, abruptly retired after only a few years of work in the 90’s.  She now has a website showing illustration work, and no mention of her comics work (that I saw in the 15 minutes I browsed it).  Her work was utterly raw, and written from the point of a young adult.  The first collection, Daddy’s Girl is about a dysfunctional nuclear family, where the father is sexually abusing the main character, Lily.  The focus of the book covers her home life and life at school, and the degree to which Lily internalises everything that happens to her.  She reacts in erratic ways to things, as everything in her life sends ripples to the way she interprets everything else.  It’s a heartbreaking book.  Lily just can’t understand her life, and feels so responsible for things that are completely out of her hands.  I’m sure this description is simplifying it too much; I have just reread it after many years, but that was my quick take away from it.  I am not a woman, and I was never abused in such a way, but the feelings are genuine and absolutely relatable.  Even as an adult, there is a quick reaction to internalise blame, but luckily adults (usually) have the sensibility to put things in perspective.  Reading Daddy’s Girl has you feel a kind of helplessness, as there is nothing you can do to help Lily understand.
I can’t help but feel that Dreschler would be a major artist today if she were still working.  When this book came out in the mid-90s, the readership of comics still skewed male, and the subject matter was enough to keep it from being really mainstream.  This is a mature, distressing book in places.  With the Internet as it is today though, this sort of work can have a much wider reach.  If only.
altcomix:

A story from Daddy’s Girl, by Debbie Dreschler.
Debbie Dreschler was an awesome comic artist who, seemingly, abruptly retired after only a few years of work in the 90’s.  She now has a website showing illustration work, and no mention of her comics work (that I saw in the 15 minutes I browsed it).  Her work was utterly raw, and written from the point of a young adult.  The first collection, Daddy’s Girl is about a dysfunctional nuclear family, where the father is sexually abusing the main character, Lily.  The focus of the book covers her home life and life at school, and the degree to which Lily internalises everything that happens to her.  She reacts in erratic ways to things, as everything in her life sends ripples to the way she interprets everything else.  It’s a heartbreaking book.  Lily just can’t understand her life, and feels so responsible for things that are completely out of her hands.  I’m sure this description is simplifying it too much; I have just reread it after many years, but that was my quick take away from it.  I am not a woman, and I was never abused in such a way, but the feelings are genuine and absolutely relatable.  Even as an adult, there is a quick reaction to internalise blame, but luckily adults (usually) have the sensibility to put things in perspective.  Reading Daddy’s Girl has you feel a kind of helplessness, as there is nothing you can do to help Lily understand.
I can’t help but feel that Dreschler would be a major artist today if she were still working.  When this book came out in the mid-90s, the readership of comics still skewed male, and the subject matter was enough to keep it from being really mainstream.  This is a mature, distressing book in places.  With the Internet as it is today though, this sort of work can have a much wider reach.  If only.
altcomix:

A story from Daddy’s Girl, by Debbie Dreschler.
Debbie Dreschler was an awesome comic artist who, seemingly, abruptly retired after only a few years of work in the 90’s.  She now has a website showing illustration work, and no mention of her comics work (that I saw in the 15 minutes I browsed it).  Her work was utterly raw, and written from the point of a young adult.  The first collection, Daddy’s Girl is about a dysfunctional nuclear family, where the father is sexually abusing the main character, Lily.  The focus of the book covers her home life and life at school, and the degree to which Lily internalises everything that happens to her.  She reacts in erratic ways to things, as everything in her life sends ripples to the way she interprets everything else.  It’s a heartbreaking book.  Lily just can’t understand her life, and feels so responsible for things that are completely out of her hands.  I’m sure this description is simplifying it too much; I have just reread it after many years, but that was my quick take away from it.  I am not a woman, and I was never abused in such a way, but the feelings are genuine and absolutely relatable.  Even as an adult, there is a quick reaction to internalise blame, but luckily adults (usually) have the sensibility to put things in perspective.  Reading Daddy’s Girl has you feel a kind of helplessness, as there is nothing you can do to help Lily understand.
I can’t help but feel that Dreschler would be a major artist today if she were still working.  When this book came out in the mid-90s, the readership of comics still skewed male, and the subject matter was enough to keep it from being really mainstream.  This is a mature, distressing book in places.  With the Internet as it is today though, this sort of work can have a much wider reach.  If only.

altcomix:

A story from Daddy’s Girl, by Debbie Dreschler.

Debbie Dreschler was an awesome comic artist who, seemingly, abruptly retired after only a few years of work in the 90’s.  She now has a website showing illustration work, and no mention of her comics work (that I saw in the 15 minutes I browsed it).  Her work was utterly raw, and written from the point of a young adult.  The first collection, Daddy’s Girl is about a dysfunctional nuclear family, where the father is sexually abusing the main character, Lily.  The focus of the book covers her home life and life at school, and the degree to which Lily internalises everything that happens to her.  She reacts in erratic ways to things, as everything in her life sends ripples to the way she interprets everything else.  It’s a heartbreaking book.  Lily just can’t understand her life, and feels so responsible for things that are completely out of her hands.  I’m sure this description is simplifying it too much; I have just reread it after many years, but that was my quick take away from it.  I am not a woman, and I was never abused in such a way, but the feelings are genuine and absolutely relatable.  Even as an adult, there is a quick reaction to internalise blame, but luckily adults (usually) have the sensibility to put things in perspective.  Reading Daddy’s Girl has you feel a kind of helplessness, as there is nothing you can do to help Lily understand.

I can’t help but feel that Dreschler would be a major artist today if she were still working.  When this book came out in the mid-90s, the readership of comics still skewed male, and the subject matter was enough to keep it from being really mainstream.  This is a mature, distressing book in places.  With the Internet as it is today though, this sort of work can have a much wider reach.  If only.

(via exitsmiling)

garabating:

Katsushika Hokusai Electronic Circuit Board

(via pelsjas)

Q

Anonymous asked:

but are you lonely?

A

rubyetc:

Probably, I forget. It’s quite easy to fill the gap where people should be with other things like excessive sleeping, bread and loathing. I do not recommend.

houseofskullboy:

houseofskullboy:

Today, I am proud to launch FRIENDS - a free, men’s lifestyle publication to be distributed in SA and parts of Asia and the US.

In order to help cover the costs of producing a free, 44-page publication, we have started a crowd funding campaign which features limited edition Sol-Sol menswear x SKULLBOY prints and tees.

Check it out, share it, get stoked.

**FIRST 20 DONORS GET A FREE SOL-SOL BUCKET HAT**

thanks

The free bucket hats are going fast!

sophieblackhallcain:

The last Heroes of Olympus book comes out in two days! I’m so excited. Here’s my favourite character Hazel Levesque, daughter of Pluto.

(via illustratedladies)

Q

davidbertucciworld asked:

Why don't you think skateboarding should be a sport? I completely agree with you just wanted to know your reasoning.

A

fuckingawesomeradio:

let us, first, look at the definition of sport: 

an activity involving physical exertion and skill in which an individual or team competes against another or others for entertainment.

when you take skateboarding and make it a competition, yes, it can be defined as a sport. that mindset, however, is the very thing i personally wanted to avoid by starting to skateboard. i abhor such events as street league and other modern ways of quantifying skateboarding into who earned the most points.

instead, i think skateboarding more closely fits the definition of an art form:

the expression or application of human creative skill and imagination, producing works to be appreciated primarily for their beauty or emotional power.

suburban-thvg:

Luan Oliveira.